» Docker Driver

Name: docker

The docker driver provides a first-class Docker workflow on Nomad. The Docker driver handles downloading containers, mapping ports, and starting, watching, and cleaning up after containers.

» Task Configuration

task "webservice" {
  driver = "docker"

  config {
    image = "redis:3.2"
    labels {
      group = "webservice-cache"
    }
  }
}

The docker driver supports the following configuration in the job spec. Only image is required.

  • image - The Docker image to run. The image may include a tag or custom URL and should include https:// if required. By default it will be fetched from Docker Hub. If the tag is omitted or equal to latest the driver will always try to pull the image. If the image to be pulled exists in a registry that requires authentication credentials must be provided to Nomad. Please see the Authentication section.

    config {
      image = "https://hub.docker.internal/redis:3.2"
    }
    
  • args - (Optional) A list of arguments to the optional command. If no command is specified, the arguments are passed directly to the container. References to environment variables or any interpretable Nomad variables will be interpreted before launching the task. For example:

    config {
      args = [
        "-bind", "${NOMAD_PORT_http}",
        "${nomad.datacenter}",
        "${MY_ENV}",
        "${meta.foo}",
      ]
    }
    
  • auth - (Optional) Provide authentication for a private registry (see below).

  • auth_soft_fail (bool: false) - Don't fail the task on an auth failure. Attempt to continue without auth.

  • command - (Optional) The command to run when starting the container.

    config {
      command = "my-command"
    }
    
  • dns_search_domains - (Optional) A list of DNS search domains for the container to use.

  • dns_options - (Optional) A list of DNS options for the container to use.

  • dns_servers - (Optional) A list of DNS servers for the container to use (e.g. ["8.8.8.8", "8.8.4.4"]). Requires Docker v1.10 or greater.

  • entrypoint - (Optional) A string list overriding the image's entrypoint.

  • extra_hosts - (Optional) A list of hosts, given as host:IP, to be added to /etc/hosts.

  • force_pull - (Optional) true or false (default). Always pull latest image instead of using existing local image. Should be set to true if repository tags are mutable.

  • hostname - (Optional) The hostname to assign to the container. When launching more than one of a task (using count) with this option set, every container the task starts will have the same hostname.

  • interactive - (Optional) true or false (default). Keep STDIN open on the container.

  • sysctl - (Optional) A key-value map of sysctl configurations to set to the containers on start.

    config {
      sysctl {
        net.core.somaxconn = "16384"
      }
    }
    
  • ulimit - (Optional) A key-value map of ulimit configurations to set to the containers on start.

    config {
      ulimit {
        nproc = "4242"
        nofile = "2048:4096"
      }
    }
    
  • privileged - (Optional) true or false (default). Privileged mode gives the container access to devices on the host. Note that this also requires the nomad agent and docker daemon to be configured to allow privileged containers.

  • ipc_mode - (Optional) The IPC mode to be used for the container. The default is none for a private IPC namespace. Other values are host for sharing the host IPC namespace or the name or id of an existing container. Note that it is not possible to refer to Docker containers started by Nomad since their names are not known in advance. Note that setting this option also requires the Nomad agent to be configured to allow privileged containers.

  • ipv4_address - (Optional) The IPv4 address to be used for the container when using user defined networks. Requires Docker 1.13 or greater.

  • ipv6_address - (Optional) The IPv6 address to be used for the container when using user defined networks. Requires Docker 1.13 or greater.

  • labels - (Optional) A key-value map of labels to set to the containers on start.

    config {
      labels {
        foo = "bar"
        zip = "zap"
      }
    }
    
  • load - (Optional) Load an image from a tar archive file instead of from a remote repository. Equivalent to the docker load -i <filename> command.

    artifact {
      source = "http://path.to/redis.tar"
    }
    config {
      load = "redis.tar"
      image = "redis"
    }
    
  • logging - (Optional) A key-value map of Docker logging options. The default value is syslog.

    config {
      logging {
        type = "fluentd"
        config {
          fluentd-address = "localhost:24224"
          tag = "your_tag"
        }
      }
    }
    
  • mac_address - (Optional) The MAC address for the container to use (e.g. "02:68:b3:29:da:98").

  • network_aliases - (Optional) A list of network-scoped aliases, provide a way for a container to be discovered by an alternate name by any other container within the scope of a particular network. Network-scoped alias is supported only for containers in user defined networks

    config {
      network_mode = "user-network"
      network_aliases = [
        "${NOMAD_TASK_NAME}",
        "${NOMAD_TASK_NAME}-${NOMAD_ALLOC_INDEX}"
      ]
    }
    
  • network_mode - (Optional) The network mode to be used for the container. In order to support userspace networking plugins in Docker 1.9 this accepts any value. The default is bridge for all operating systems but Windows, which defaults to nat. Other networking modes may not work without additional configuration on the host (which is outside the scope of Nomad). Valid values pre-docker 1.9 are default, bridge, host, none, or container:name.

  • pid_mode - (Optional) host or not set (default). Set to host to share the PID namespace with the host. Note that this also requires the Nomad agent to be configured to allow privileged containers. See below for more details.

  • port_map - (Optional) A key-value map of port labels (see below).

  • security_opt - (Optional) A list of string flags to pass directly to --security-opt. For example:

    config {
      security_opt = [
        "credentialspec=file://gmsaUser.json",
      ]
    }
    
  • shm_size - (Optional) The size (bytes) of /dev/shm for the container.

  • SSL - (Optional) If this is set to true, Nomad uses SSL to talk to the repository. The default value is true. Deprecated as of 0.5.3

  • tty - (Optional) true or false (default). Allocate a pseudo-TTY for the container.

  • uts_mode - (Optional) host or not set (default). Set to host to share the UTS namespace with the host. Note that this also requires the Nomad agent to be configured to allow privileged containers.

  • userns_mode - (Optional) host or not set (default). Set to host to use the host's user namespace when user namespace remapping is enabled on the docker daemon.

  • volumes - (Optional) A list of host_path:container_path strings to bind host paths to container paths. Mounting host paths outside of the allocation directory can be disabled on clients by setting the docker.volumes.enabled option set to false. This will limit volumes to directories that exist inside the allocation directory.

    config {
      volumes = [
        # Use absolute paths to mount arbitrary paths on the host
        "/path/on/host:/path/in/container",
    
        # Use relative paths to rebind paths already in the allocation dir
        "relative/to/task:/also/in/container"
      ]
    }
    
  • volume_driver - (Optional) The name of the volume driver used to mount volumes. Must be used along with volumes. Using a volume_driver also allows to use volumes with a named volume as well as absolute paths. If docker.volumes.enabled is false then volume drivers are disallowed.

    config {
      volumes = [
        # Use named volume created outside nomad.
        "name-of-the-volume:/path/in/container"
      ]
      # Name of the Docker Volume Driver used by the container
      volume_driver = "pxd"
    }
    
  • work_dir - (Optional) The working directory inside the container.

  • mounts - (Optional) A list of mounts to be mounted into the container. Only volume type mounts are supported.

    config {
      mounts = [
        {
          target = "/path/in/container"
          source = "name-of-volume"
          readonly = false
          volume_options {
            no_copy = false
            labels {
              foo = "bar"
            }
            driver_config {
              name = "pxd"
              options = {
                foo = "bar"
              }
            }
          }
        }
      ]
    }
    
  • devices - (Optional) A list of devices to be exposed the container. host_path is the only required field. By default, the container will be able to read, write and mknod these devices. Use the optional cgroup_permissions field to restrict permissions.

    config {
      devices = [
        {
          host_path = "/dev/sda1"
          container_path = "/dev/xvdc"
          cgroup_permissions = "r"
        },
        {
          host_path = "/dev/sda2"
          container_path = "/dev/xvdd"
        }
      ]
    }
    
  • cap_add - (Optional) A list of Linux capabilities as strings to pass directly to --cap-add. Effective capabilities (computed from cap_add and cap_drop) have to match the configured whitelist. The whitelist can be customized using the docker.caps.whitelist key in the client node's configuration. For example:

    config {
      cap_add = [
        "SYS_TIME",
      ]
    }
    
  • cap_drop - (Optional) A list of Linux capabilities as strings to pass directly to --cap-drop. Effective capabilities (computed from cap_add and cap_drop) have to match the configured whitelist. The whitelist can be customized using the docker.caps.whitelist key in the client node's configuration. For example:

    config {
      cap_drop = [
        "MKNOD",
      ]
    }
    
  • cpu_hard_limit - (Optional) true or false (default). Use hard CPU limiting instead of soft limiting. By default this is false which means soft limiting is used and containers are able to burst above their CPU limit when there is idle capacity.

  • cpu_cfs_period - (Optional) An integer value that specifies the duration in microseconds of the period during which the CPU usage quota is measured. The default is 100000 (0.1 second) and the maximum allowed value is 1000000 (1 second). See here for more details.

  • advertise_ipv6_address - (Optional) true or false (default). Use the container's IPv6 address (GlobalIPv6Address in Docker) when registering services and checks. See IPv6 Docker containers for details.

  • readonly_rootfs - (Optional) true or false (default). Mount the container's filesystem as read only.

  • pids_limit - (Optional) An integer value that specifies the pid limit for the container. Defaults to unlimited.

» Container Name

Nomad creates a container after pulling an image. Containers are named {taskName}-{allocId}. This is necessary in order to place more than one container from the same task on a host (e.g. with count > 1). This also means that each container's name is unique across the cluster.

This is not configurable.

» Authentication

If you want to pull from a private repo (for example on dockerhub or quay.io), you will need to specify credentials in your job via:

  • the auth option in the task config.

  • by storing explicit repository credentials or by specifying Docker credHelpers in a file and setting the docker.auth.config value on the client.

  • by specifying a docker.auth.helper on the client

The auth object supports the following keys:

  • username - (Optional) The account username.

  • password - (Optional) The account password.

  • email - (Optional) The account email.

  • server_address - (Optional) The server domain/IP without the protocol. Docker Hub is used by default.

Example task-config:

task "example" {
  driver = "docker"

  config {
    image = "secret/service"

    auth {
      username = "dockerhub_user"
      password = "dockerhub_password"
    }
  }
}

Example docker-config, using two helper scripts in $PATH, "docker-credential-ecr" and "docker-credential-vault":

{
  "auths": {
    "internal.repo": { "auth": "`echo -n '<username>:<password>' | base64 -w0`" }
  },
  "credHelpers": {
      "<XYZ>.dkr.ecr.<region>.amazonaws.com": "ecr-login"
  },
  "credsStore": "secretservice"
}

Example agent configuration, using a helper script "docker-credential-ecr" in $PATH

client {
  enabled = true
  options {
    "docker.auth.helper" = "ecr"
  }
}

» Networking

Docker supports a variety of networking configurations, including using host interfaces, SDNs, etc. Nomad uses bridged networking by default, like Docker.

You can specify other networking options, including custom networking plugins in Docker 1.9. You may need to perform additional configuration on the host in order to make these work. This additional configuration is outside the scope of Nomad.

» Allocating Ports

You can allocate ports to your task using the port syntax described on the networking page. Here is a recap:

task "example" {
  driver = "docker"

  resources {
    network {
      port "http" {}
      port "https" {}
    }
  }
}

» Forwarding and Exposing Ports

A Docker container typically specifies which port a service will listen on by specifying the EXPOSE directive in the Dockerfile.

Because dynamic ports will not match the ports exposed in your Dockerfile, Nomad will automatically expose all of the ports it allocates to your container.

These ports will be identified via environment variables. For example:

port "http" {}

If Nomad allocates port 23332 to your task for http, 23332 will be automatically exposed and forwarded to your container, and the driver will set an environment variable NOMAD_PORT_http with the value 23332 that you can read inside your container.

This provides an easy way to use the host networking option for better performance.

» Using the Port Map

If you prefer to use the traditional port-mapping method, you can specify the port_map option in your job specification. It looks like this:

task "example" {
  driver = "docker"

  config {
    image = "redis"

    port_map {
      redis = 6379
    }
  }

  resources {
    network {
      mbits = 20
      port "redis" {}
    }
  }
}

If Nomad allocates port 23332 to your task, the Docker driver will automatically setup the port mapping from 23332 on the host to 6379 in your container, so it will just work!

Note that by default this only works with bridged networking mode. It may also work with custom networking plugins which implement the same API for expose and port forwarding.

» Advertising Container IPs

New in Nomad 0.6.

When using network plugins like weave that assign containers a routable IP address, that address will automatically be used in any service advertisements for the task. You may override what address is advertised by using the address_mode parameter on a service. See service for details.

» Networking Protocols

The Docker driver configures ports on both the tcp and udp protocols.

This is not configurable.

» Other Networking Modes

Some networking modes like container or none will require coordination outside of Nomad. First-class support for these options may be improved later through Nomad plugins or dynamic job configuration.

» Client Requirements

Nomad requires Docker to be installed and running on the host alongside the Nomad agent. Nomad was developed against Docker 1.8.2 and 1.9.

By default Nomad communicates with the Docker daemon using the daemon's Unix socket. Nomad will need to be able to read/write to this socket. If you do not run Nomad as root, make sure you add the Nomad user to the Docker group so Nomad can communicate with the Docker daemon.

For example, on Ubuntu you can use the usermod command to add the vagrant user to the docker group so you can run Nomad without root:

sudo usermod -G docker -a vagrant

For the best performance and security features you should use recent versions of the Linux Kernel and Docker daemon.

» Client Configuration

The docker driver has the following client configuration options:

  • docker.endpoint - If using a non-standard socket, HTTP or another location, or if TLS is being used, docker.endpoint must be set. If unset, Nomad will attempt to instantiate a Docker client using the DOCKER_HOST environment variable and then fall back to the default listen address for the given operating system. Defaults to unix:///var/run/docker.sock on Unix platforms and npipe:////./pipe/docker_engine for Windows.

  • docker.auth.config - Allows an operator to specify a JSON file which is in the dockercfg format containing authentication information for a private registry, from either (in order) auths, credHelpers or credsStore.

  • docker.auth.helper - Allows an operator to specify a credsStore -like script on $PATH to lookup authentication information from external sources. The script's name must begin with docker-credential- and this option should include only the basename of the script, not the path.

  • docker.tls.cert - Path to the server's certificate file (.pem). Specify this along with docker.tls.key and docker.tls.ca to use a TLS client to connect to the docker daemon. docker.endpoint must also be specified or this setting will be ignored.

  • docker.tls.key - Path to the client's private key (.pem). Specify this along with docker.tls.cert and docker.tls.ca to use a TLS client to connect to the docker daemon. docker.endpoint must also be specified or this setting will be ignored.

  • docker.tls.ca - Path to the server's CA file (.pem). Specify this along with docker.tls.cert and docker.tls.key to use a TLS client to connect to the docker daemon. docker.endpoint must also be specified or this setting will be ignored.

  • docker.cleanup.image Defaults to true. Changing this to false will prevent Nomad from removing images from stopped tasks.

  • docker.cleanup.image.delay A time duration, as defined here, that defaults to 3m. The delay controls how long Nomad will wait between an image being unused and deleting it. If a tasks is received that uses the same image within the delay, the image will be reused.

  • docker.volumes.enabled: Defaults to true. Allows tasks to bind host paths (volumes) inside their container and use volume drivers (volume_driver). Binding relative paths is always allowed and will be resolved relative to the allocation's directory.

  • docker.volumes.selinuxlabel: Allows the operator to set a SELinux label to the allocation and task local bind-mounts to containers. If used with docker.volumes.enabled set to false, the labels will still be applied to the standard binds in the container.

  • docker.privileged.enabled Defaults to false. Changing this to true will allow containers to use privileged mode, which gives the containers full access to the host's devices. Note that you must set a similar setting on the Docker daemon for this to work.

  • docker.caps.whitelist: A list of allowed Linux capabilities. Defaults to "CHOWN,DAC_OVERRIDE,FSETID,FOWNER,MKNOD,NET_RAW,SETGID,SETUID,SETFCAP,SETPCAP,NET_BIND_SERVICE,SYS_CHROOT,KILL,AUDIT_WRITE", which is the list of capabilities allowed by docker by default, as defined here. Allows the operator to control which capabilities can be obtained by tasks using cap_add and cap_drop options. Supports the value "ALL" as a shortcut for whitelisting all capabilities.

  • docker.cleanup.container: Defaults to true. This option can be used to disable Nomad from removing a container when the task exits. Under a name conflict, Nomad may still remove the dead container.

Note: When testing or using the -dev flag you can use DOCKER_HOST, DOCKER_TLS_VERIFY, and DOCKER_CERT_PATH to customize Nomad's behavior. If docker.endpoint is set Nomad will only read client configuration from the config file.

An example is given below:

client {
  options {
    "docker.cleanup.image" = "false"
  }
}

» Client Attributes

The docker driver will set the following client attributes:

Here is an example of using these properties in a job file:

job "docs" {
  # Require docker version higher than 1.2.
  constraint {
    attribute = "${driver.docker.version}"
    operator  = ">"
    version   = "1.2"
  }
}

» Resource Isolation

» CPU

Nomad limits containers' CPU based on CPU shares. CPU shares allow containers to burst past their CPU limits. CPU limits will only be imposed when there is contention for resources. When the host is under load your process may be throttled to stabilize QoS depending on how many shares it has. You can see how many CPU shares are available to your process by reading NOMAD_CPU_LIMIT. 1000 shares are approximately equal to 1 GHz.

Please keep the implications of CPU shares in mind when you load test workloads on Nomad.

» Memory

Nomad limits containers' memory usage based on total virtual memory. This means that containers scheduled by Nomad cannot use swap. This is to ensure that a swappy process does not degrade performance for other workloads on the same host.

Since memory is not an elastic resource, you will need to make sure your container does not exceed the amount of memory allocated to it, or it will be terminated or crash when it tries to malloc. A process can inspect its memory limit by reading NOMAD_MEMORY_LIMIT, but will need to track its own memory usage. Memory limit is expressed in megabytes so 1024 = 1 GB.

» IO

Nomad's Docker integration does not currently provide QoS around network or filesystem IO. These will be added in a later release.

» Security

Docker provides resource isolation by way of cgroups and namespaces. Containers essentially have a virtual file system all to themselves. If you need a higher degree of isolation between processes for security or other reasons, it is recommended to use full virtualization like QEMU.

» Docker for Mac Caveats

Docker for Mac runs Docker inside a small VM and then allows access to parts of the host filesystem into that VM. At present, nomad uses a syslog server bound to a Unix socket within a path that both the host and the VM can access to forward log messages back to nomad. But at present, Docker For Mac does not work for Unix domain sockets (https://github.com/docker/for-mac/issues/483) in one of these shared paths.

As a result, using nomad with the docker driver on OS X/macOS will work, but no logs will be available to nomad. Users must use the native docker facilities to examine the logs of any jobs running under docker.

In the future, we will resolve this issue, one way or another.

» Docker for Windows Caveats

Docker for Windows only supports running Windows containers. Because Docker for Windows is relatively new and rapidly evolving you may want to consult the list of relevant issues on GitHub.